Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
STATION
CNBC 7
FBC 7
MSNBCW 7
CSPAN 6
CNNW 5
KQED (PBS) 2
CNN 1
CSPAN2 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 48
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
to go before the united states faces the fiscal cliff, the white house has rejected a proposal from house republicans to prevent tax hikes and spending cuts at the end of the year. no formal talks between the two sides are scheduled today. will go outside the nation's capital to get your voice involved. republicans -- democrats -- independents -- send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with some of the papers across the country today and how this latest proposal from house republicans is playing out in the papers. courtesy of "the atlantic journal-constitution" -- here is "the denver post" -- finally, here is "of the arizona republic" -- here is "the washington post" on what is inside this deal -- we want to get your take on this. what do you think? ted in new york, a democratic caller. what do you think? caller: good morning. i do not think it goes far enough. i think it was greenspan that i heard last week said in a discussion panel that a recession as a result of going over the fiscal slope would be a small price to pay to pay back all the
spending, we've got that fiscal cliff coming up january 1. might this conversation somehow be used to make some progress on that? >> reporter: it could because of the fact the other person on mitt romney's schedule today is congressman paul ryan, the house budget chairman. of course was his running mate back during the campaign. paul ryan has a key role in these budget talks of course as well. where they stand, a short time ago vice president biden went to a local costco here in washington, d.c., proclaimed himself optimistic they would get a deal. the fact of the matter yesterday, erskine bowles, a key player as well, saying he is slightly pessimistic. he says there is 2/3 chance they will go off the fiscal cliff. that is not what the markets want to hear, jon. jon: not at all. ed henry at the white house. if jay carney relents and let you into the meeting give us a shot. we'll be on air. >> reporter: i will give you a copy of the menu. jon: please do, thanks. jenna: we'll forget about politicians just for a moment. i promise we'll return there surely over the next couple hours. let's tal
and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our countries debt crisis and get our economy going again and create jobs. right now, all eyes are on the white house. our country does not need a victory lap, it needs leadership. it is time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they are really going to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [inaudible question] >> we have outlined very specific proposals that we passed in last year's budget and the budget before. we know what the venue is. what we do not know is what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [inaudible question] >> i am not going to get into the details. it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur. we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. [inaudible question] >> no, no, no. stop. i have to tell you, i am disappointed in where we are. i am disappointed in what has happened over the last couple weeks. with the
in the fiscal cliff debate. tax rates spike and spending slashed. congress is breaking for the holidays in two weeks. it could send the economy spinning in directions. $1.6 trillion in tax hikes. he will travel to pennsylvania to sell it to you. republicans aren't buying it. listen to house speaker, john boehner. >> despite the claims the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. >> democrats are firing right back at boehner. harry reid getting a little personal. >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. okay? >> ouch. athena jones live from washington. same old same old. where do we go from here? >> that's the big question. the nice talk after the election is pretty much gone away. you mentioned one of the big sticking points, that's taxes. republicans and democrats can't agree on how to raise the tax revenue? end the bush tax cuts for the wealthy, close the loopholes, raise the capital gains taxes or all of the above. right now, they can't agree on how much money should be raised on the revenue side. let's listen to
. speaker, roughly what size spending cuts do you think it would take to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff, and do you think that at least the promise of spending cuts has to be included in this level deal at this time? >> i don't think there's -- i don't think it's productive for either side to lay out hard lines in terms of what the size of the spending cuts ought to be. there's clearly -- there are a lot of options on how you could get there. but the second part of your question was? >> my question is, do you think the promise of spending cuts has to be included in the deal that averts the fiscal cliff? >> there's a framework that we presented to the white house two weeks ago. the framework is -- has been agreed to in terms of really a down payment on the end of this year. now, that would include spending cuts and it would include revenue. setting up a process for entitlement reform for next year and tax reform for next year. but -- but -- but this is way out of balance. and not a recognition on the part of the white house about the serious spending problem that we have. >> faced with t
house is in fact open to having spending cuts as part of this discussion in the fiscal cliff talks. i think what is going on here is the white house heard the criticism and they are trying to breathe some new life into these talks. politico reported there was a phone call between the president and speaker boehner. they claim it was curt as in a short call that did not go well. jay carney just pushed back and said it was a 28-minute phone call. he said it was frank and direct. and it was good, it was positive. they believe, the white house does, that they are making progress. but i pressed jay carney. i said will spending cuts be included? and here is what he said. >> can you hold up that budget, look in the camera and say to your fellow democrats on capitol hill, vote for and include some of these spending cuts in this deal to avoid the fiscal cliff? because that's not what they are doing. should they include those? >> yes. and i know that democrats accept that there -- this has to be a balanced package that includes revenues and cuts and spending cuts. >> reporter: so news the white
a year end deadline, the white house is wasting no time rejecting the republicans' fiscal cliff counter offer on tax reforms and spending cuts. the gop plan consists of $2.2 trillion in saving officials a decade including raging the age for medicare from 65 to 67 and lowering the cost of living increases for social security benefits. they also propose overhauling the tax code to generate $800 billion in new revenue but without raising taxes on the wealthy. frn in a letter to the president, republicans attempted to sell the offer as the erskine bowles plan, comparing it to the same offer he drew up last year. >> i think he'd disagree. >> the co-chair of obama's deficit commission, but yesterday mr. bowles flatly rejected that connection. meanwhile, the white house is turning to campaign style messaging as a reminder of whose tax plan was chosen in the court of public opinion on election day. >> under my plan, first of all, 98% of folks who make less than 250,000, you wouldn't see your income taxes go up a single dime. all right? because you're the ones who need relief. but we're not goin
, protect american jobs, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country does not need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it is time for the president and congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they're willing to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [indiscernible] >> it has been very clear over the last year and a half. i have talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budgets where we outlined specific proposals that we passed last year and the year before. we know what the menu is. we do not know what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [indiscernible] >> i am not going to get into details, but it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur, but we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. >> most public statements have been optimistic. we ar
on this fiscal cliff which has automatic tax hikes and spending cuts as of january one, they are trying to avert that. he says any deal on this must include an end to the debt ceiling all together. he wants complete power to raise the country's limit by himself. he doesn't want to have to get congressional approval. that is a demand stirring strong response from republicans today. >> the on way we ever cut spending is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that spur to cut all together. of course, it gets in the way of his spending plans. i can assure you it one happen. the american people want washington to get spending under control and the debt limit is the best tool we have to make the president take that demand seriously. the american people want us to fight to cut spending. it's a fight they deserve and a fight we are happy to have. >> joining me now, simon rosenberg. and mark theisen. guys, welcome. simon, let me start with you on this. we did have some democrats come on the show and say no, the president doesn't get to just decide when to rais
the likelihood they'll strike a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff. mining giant rio tinto plans to reign in spending by $7 billion, but still promises to beef up iron ore output. uk banks bracing for possible new rules. and hitting the jackpot, the search is on for the lucky winners of the power ball lockry as two tickets matched all the the numbers. >>> look at the yields falling to 5.22 and 4.5% respectively. italy was town break the 4.5% mark earlier. euro-dollar is rebounding. dollar-yen also moving higher. aussie dollar was an underperformer. gold prices have stabilized. what did the volatile prices mean? we're joined by scott evans. scott, welcome. the extra ordinary move yesterday in gold wasn't so much the decline as the nature of it. we saw a sharp falloff in gold and other commodities. broadly speaking, volatility when it comes to the metals, is it an important part of the thesis for mining stocks? >> i think less so. it's more of a short to medium term call. it's much more to do on with a positive on rios, as well. if you look across the uk listed mining sectors, you come up with a reason
day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've been keeping my own naughty and nice lists for washington. >> warner: the president chose a seasonal setting, a toy factory in hatfield, pennsylvania, and holiday imagery to press again for extending tax cuts for the middle class. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1. i mean, i... i'm assuming that doesn't sound too good to you. >> no. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> warner: in washington, republicans portrayed the road trip as so much humbug, at a time, they said, when negotiations are going nowhere. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. >> warner: house speaker john boehner said republicans remain willing to raise revenues, but not by raising tax rates. and he charged the white house isn't
federal spending cuts unless congress and the president act so-called fiscal cliff. on the senate floor today, top senate democrat, here he was, harry reid, said the republican counteroffer unveiled yesterday is a serious proposal. reid called the offer a nonstarter. his word. but a serious proposal nonetheless. in an interview just today with bloomberg tv, president obama did not reject the gop offer outright. officials have called it a step backward, not worthy of a counteroffer. but, you know, bottom line here, you have two sides they appear to be pretty far apart with no new negotiations happening at least not to our knowledge. so, with me now from capitol hill is representative peter wel welch. democrat from vermont. good to see you. thanks for coming on. >> thank you. >> so let me just pose this one to you. you just heard harry reid, would you agree with harry reid the plan offered yesterday by that house speaker is, quote unquote, a serious plan? >> well, you know, i don't know the details of it. it is $800 billion supposedly in revenues and it is a lot of medicare cuts but not s
danger of going off the fiscal cliff. >> we are not going to kick the can down the road. we're going to finalize this this year. this is no time for delay. the american people want us to avoid the fiscal cliff with a balanced approach. liz: he said, he said. good afternoon, everybody. i am liz claman, "countdown to the closing bell" starts right now. you heard it from the horses mouth. and it has gyrated the market. john boehner said no substantial progress on fiscal cliff debt deal while harry reid insists we democrats are on track and will finalize it this year. even chuck schumer weighed in saying progress is being made on the hill and the next is a taste oversensitive. take a look at the intraday, you can see how it was jerked around today. right around 11:30 a.m., speaker john maye -- john boehner spoke. the buyers poured in, the short time later chuck schumer came in. now we are trading near the highs of the day. the dow jones dust they stop 77 points, 45 to the upside. all 10 s. and p. sectors are jumping with technologies leading the way. research in motion a big winner. can
with a plan on how he wants to avert the fiscal cliff. it is irresponsible of us not to deal with the spending issue and simply to push for raising taxes on hard-working american people. many of us come from small- business backgrounds -- family owned businesses. we understand the situation very well. but it isn't -- it is important we not pass this problem along to our children and grandchildren, but we deal with it in a responsible way. the republicans have come forward with a responsible plan and will continue to do that and look for ways to keep us from going over this fiscal cliff. >> we have time for a couple questions before we go to our meeting. >> your colleague has told other colleagues that it is time to vote to extend the middle-class tax cut -- i want to get your take on his comments. more importantly, is this the direction the conference is going? >> i told tom earlier that i disagree with him. he is a wonderful friend and a great supporter of mine, but raising taxes on the so-called top 2%, half as taxpayers are small business owners who pay their taxes with personal income tax
officials trading insults, playing the blame game here as the clock is winding down on the fiscal cliff. keep in mind time is a-wasting. in 32 days now tax rates soar, spending gets slashed. oh, and don't forget, congress, yeah, they get to take a break for the holidays in 14 days. a recipe for recession. the president is pitching a plan that calls for $1.6 trillion in tax heights and $50 billion in new infrastructure spending. he'll head to a manufacturing plant in pennsylvania to push all this. republicans aren't buying in. listen to house speaker john boehner's reaction. >> despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. >> didn't take very long for democrats to hit back at speaker boehner. senate majority leader harry reid got up, a little personal. >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. >> i don't understand his brain. let's go to washington this morning. wow, just when we thought they were getting closer seems like they're even farther apart this morning. >> yeah, you know, the nic
, and spending cuts that many believe would be a fiscal cliff that would kick in on january the 1st. chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel is watching it all unfold on capitol hill. what do we know about the visit about the expectations for what might happen during it. >> reporter: martha, timothy geithner arrived here on capitol hill a short time ago to meet first with senate majority leader harry reid. we know he's having individual meetings with the top four leaders of congress. what republicans have said they want to hear, and republicans will be critical, because they need republican support to get any final fiscal cliff deal through the senate, and also through the house, they say they hope that he's coming with concrete spending cut ideas that are acceptable to the administration. one of the meetings today will be with senate republican leader mitch mcconnell who a short time ago sounded pretty fired up. >> the only reason democrats are insisting on raising rates is because raising rates on the so-called rich is the holy grail of liberalism. their aim is not job he tkraoe a
to an agreement to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. it's one of the reasons why we believe that we put revenue on the table as long as it's accompanied by serious spending cuts. to avert this crisis. >> now, to be fair, speaker boehner did not want to lay out a bunch of spending cuts on camera, at least. he says he will save those discussions, those negotiations for his talks with the president. shep. >> shepard: those are always behind closed doors, those spending cut talks. mike emanuel at the rotunda at the russell building. thanks. if you win tonight's power ball jackpot you can stop worrying about anything washington does go. out and buy your own country and make your own laws. tonight's jackpot is now $550 million. that's a record for power ball and the second highest lottery jackpot ever in our country. lottery officials say tickets are selling at a rate of, get this: 130,000 tickets per minute. and a lot of people say they already know what they are going to do if they win. >> i would go away and hide for a little bit. >> some of it it is going to go to charity. and then it's going to
a lot of economists that fear this concern and all the dialogue about the fiscal cliff is already starting to hurt the economy, do you agree? >> you see that with the investment spending, and it can only get worse as we get closer to the end of the year as everybody holds their breath in the economy collectively, we have big problems. lori: one thing was the incredible amount of government spending especially on defense. one of the biggest issues is concerning. >> the issue really is what happened in the current quarter and going into the beginning of next year. other types of discretionary spending is as well. the total is $600 billion, the economy simply cannot withstand that sort of shock. we saw a week underlining detail report. know the economy will be soft in the current quarter due in part to hurricane sandy but also the slower trends in the various components. lori: 1.7 is the consensus estimate of expansion, what are you thinking? >> we're forecasting 1.3%. in the ballpark of 1.7 before hurricane made landfall. more of a ceiling than a floor at this point. lori: anything
. the concern is well founded. >> and my thanks to john wattson. >>> political posturing on the fiscal cliff from leading republicans and democrats alike. >> i remain hopeful that productive conversations can be had in the days ahead. but the white house has to get serious. >> we have made our proposal. let them come forward with something. >> find out what senate majority leader harry reid's nevada constituents are saying about his performance. >>> also, is it time for the u.s. to join the ranks and put $1 billis to rest in favor of a $1 coin? believe it or not, people feel passionate about this issue. our heated debate is coming next. stay with us. system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have so
. >>> president obama made the opening bid in the fiscal cliff negotiation sending his plan to capitol hill on thursday. $1.6 trillion in tax hikes and $50 billion in new spending. but house republicans, surprise-surprise, say democrats aren't being serious. >> the president has warned us about the dangers of going over the fiscal cliff. but his actions have not matched his public statements. members of his own party seem quite comfortable sending the economy over the fiscal cliff. >> let's bring in our friday gaggle, associate editor and columnist for the hill amy stoddard, danielle gibbs, and columnist for bloomberg view and national review and one of the funnier people on twitter and he did not pay me to say that but i will start with you. so we kind of feel like we're back to square one. should republicans having seen them lose the presidency by a wider margin than many people thought lose seats in the senate which i don't think almost anybody -- unless you're a loyal democrat thought, and lose seats, though, to keep control of the house three and a half weeks ago. should they be more w
cannot address the fiscal cliff without talking about entitlements, which are 54% of our spending. anybody can do the math on that. thank you, mr. president. and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the nuclear from arizona. -- the senator from arizona. mr. kyl: i thank my colleague from texas for her leadership on this and so many other issues we have worked on over the years. one of my regrets in leaving the senate that i will not be able to work with her. we'll be off doing something else, but we're not going to give up on the fights we've been engaged in over the years. i want to pick up where my colleague left off about the meanings of this fiscal cliff and what is being proposed as alternatives to going over the fiscal cliff. i was interested that in week the president has embarked on what one newspaper referred to as "the fiscal cliff campaign trail." he is out as if the campaign were still going on, and the centerpiece of his pitch -- and i heard him say it again last night -- is that the house of representatives should pass a bill that was passed in the senate relate
say we don't want to become like greece. what's driving off the fiscal cliff look like? it makes us look completely irresponsible as if we can't control our own spending and put in order some priorities. >> so some health care will be suffering? >> that's absolutely true. we want to incentive doctors ask hospitals to keep people well. not to just do procedures. and that's the key to really transforming medicare. >> i want to show you a map of the states that are refusing to implement the insurance exchanges. it's rather interesting. the other states are either implementing the exchanges or haven't decided to do that. if states don't decide to do it and the federal government comes in and sets up the exchange, isn't that kind of a win for the move towards universal health care because the infrastructure will be there? >> i think it provides people an option whether governors are refusing or not. that's the most important thing so they can get access to insurance products. also i think, you know, it takes away the claim that the federal government is u surping health care. states forf
of the screen. we have lots more in the show. twenty-six days until we fall off the fiscal cliff. is that what democrats want us to do? pictures seem so. we go live to capitol hill in 10 minutes. while congress talked about wanting to cut excess spending, the numbers may tell a different story. i will break it down coming up next. ally bank. why they have a raise your rate cd tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in econocs, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise ur rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. gerri: where would we be without senator tom coburn? without the oklahoma taxpayer dollars? this fellow brought us this image. your member this? the shrimp on on the treadmill. does anyone have? @%e national science foundation studying the effects on disease. they decided to do this, and they spend 500,000 taxpayer dollars doing this study. if you can get scientists to waste money, the senator is back with another study. this time uncove
selling stock on concerns about the impending peril of the so-called fiscal cliff. president obama for his part seems utterly unimpressed by market volatility and the consequences of failure to resolve the issues of tax hikes and spending cuts that go into affect the first of the year. as the markets were falling in the first hour of trading this morning, house speaker john maynard stood up and offered support to investors and leaders for the market. stocks stabilized and then began climbing on the speaker's expression of optimism that a deal is within reach. we will take all of that up and more here tonight with bedford open geyser ceo harvey eisen and republicans who have put tax revenue on the negotiating table , and some republicans have flat out repudiated their anti-tax increase pledge. the author of that pledge, grover norquist, here and we will ask him how it is that he came to be the villain in this piece, how it feels to be the subject of attacks from both the left and some on the right and what the future holds for those republicans who break their pledges to voters. also tonigh
the resources, but at a time when we are talking about the fiscal cliff, soaring deficits and whatnot i asked whether or not that will be paid for. they will come up with other budget offsets or the emergency money will go straight to the deficit. he said it was unclear. that probably means it will go to the deficit. as you know they are having a hard time right now finding other things to cut in terms of spending. so while there are people who need it, that's going to be another major issue moving forward. how the federal government will spend about $50 billion when right now we are pretty much broke, neil. >> incredible. they know it is a nonstarter. do they not care? >> it is probably going to end up, as you know, you have seen this before, folded into the rest of the negotiations. you are right. there will be p republicans objecting. some said we don't need budget offset. there are republicans saying yes we do. it will probably end up getting rolled into the broader fight over the fiscal cliff. it is unlikely they will get pay fors. >> ed henry, thank you very much. the super hero versus
's not a fiscal cliff. the truth is we have a tax decision coming up and we have a spending decision coming up. truthfully, we need more spending decisions coming up. sequester is a new word that we brought up. the sequester, as you recall, mr. speaker, was the hammer that we put in place way back, one of the first big votes you and i took way back in august of 2011. that was part of an agreement that the president wanted to raise the debt ceiling. there were bills that needed to be paid. the speaker of the house, john boehner, said we're not going to expand america's credit card until we get serious about curbing spending. he said, no, mr. president, i will not raise the limit on america's credit card unless you agree to dollar-for-dollar reductions on the spending side of the ledger so that we're not just making the problem worse, we're creating a pathway to solve the problem altogether. i admire the speaker for that. and the speaker and the president agreed on this proposal. it was called the budget control act of 2011, and what it did was to create a -- a committee here on capitol hill, fi
on streets signs. >> see you then, mandy. thank you. >>> the fast-approaching fiscal cliff causing a lot of nervousness among businesses. the uncertainty over taxes causing many of them to pull back on spending and hiring, especially among the small manufacturing companies. our phil lebeau with new and exclusive data on that very subject. what do the numbers look like, phil? >> not pretty, sue. we talked with the folks at pay net, who track about 20 million loans involving 17 million small businesses and essentially, what they have found going back and looking at the data in the second quarter is essentially, this summer, a real pull back by small manufacturers, cutting investment in plants and equipment by 50%. the transportation equipment manufacturing sector, in particular that he saw a big dropoff, roughly 33%. when you take a look at small manufacturers overall, look at the end there. you see that dip there, going below the dotted line? that shows they have gone into negative territory in the second quarter when it comes to investment. the one silver lining here is small manufacture
. but if there's no deal and the country goes over that fiscal cliff, taxes go up for everyone, mandatory spending cuts go into effect, a lot of folks are going to say where was the president? he was just re-elected. why couldn't he put together a package, a deal to avoid this disaster? >> i think this is a question of political leadership. and as that poll showed, there's no doubt that the president has the political advantage going into this. but at some point, and i think we're kind of getting close to it, the president has to be able to pivot and to say how do i turn this political advantage into a real policy accomplishment? and, wolf, i don't think you're going to do that with continued campaign style events like we just saw meeting with middle class families. okay. we get that. that occurred during the campaign. the white house has clearly gotten its message out. i think now there has to be a next step. you know, timing is everything in politics. and this is absolutely no different. what i'm getting from talking to some democrats on the hill is i think there's actually a lot of pen
the national dialog is focused on the fiscal cliff which has the potential to significantly affect state budgets many governors are also tackling the implementation of obama care. starting in 2014 medicaid will be expanded to all americans within 138% of the poverty line, which is individuals making $15,000 a year or less, give health care to as many as 21 million additional americans. eight governors including one of those at the white house today, oklahoma republican governor mary fallin are rejecting the offer, concerned their states may have to foot the bill down the road. the president was sure to have some thoughts following their pow wow at the white house. the six governors are on to meet with house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid this afternoon, also sure to have some thoughts. joy, the medicare question is really interesting in terms of how the governors play this one. in so far as, if you're a republican governor and offered the federal -- the federal government says it's going to cover i believe 100% of the cost of expanding the rolls from 2014 to 2
in the fiscal cliff argument, the solution -- there is no economic growth. not possible with what's being proposed. in fact just the exact opposite. obama does not care about economic growth. he cares about wealth transfers, redistribution. >> it's obvious that he's going to have to stand behind some significant changes in entitlements, and i think what they're asking him is what is your plan? >> there has to be an agreement. there has to be an agreement, i believe, that everybody knows what the possibilities are, so let's just do it. >> the work has to be done. that work is being done. everybody needs to, as the president said, agree to the principle, that compromise will require tough choices by each side. >> we have done our part. we have put revenues on the table, something that we didn't do two years ago during the debt ceiling negotiations. >> i am ready and able and willing and excited to go ahead and get this issue resolved in a bipartisan fashion, so that american families, american businesses, have some certainty going into next year. >> this is not -- the fiscal cliff is not ab
the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less social security and they pay more for their medicare? it meets the president's animus that we must get more mone
who argue that we should go off the fiscal cliff, that it will push them to negotiate a sort of more thoughtful deal -- >> right. >> -- they say that it's not a fiscal cliff, it's, you know, more of a slope. having said that, what is your thought on the psychological impact if we go off the cliff? >> it's huge. it's tremendous. it's absolutely tremendous because it will go across the board from regular americans who are going to see their taxes go up from $500 to $2,000 for middle-income household. this is going to affect their bottom line tremendously. that's groceries. that's saving money. that's their savings money for the year. but also what about mortgage interest? will that affect the housing market? there may be initial -- basically, it will go back down again, the housing market. or if it gets phased in, maybe we'll see a jump because people will rush in before the deduction completely goes away. but i think there's a lot of concern and a lot of panic among regular americans about will i lose these tax deductions? and what's that going to do to the ability to pay all my bills
for 24 hours with prevacid24hr. >>> welcome back. the fight over the fiscal cliff heating up with both parties accusing the other of failing to offer substantial plans. >> to this point, that's right. without a deal, automatic spending cuts and higher taxes will kick in january 1st. that's something our next guest wants to avoid. we welcome back democratic congressman charlie rangel of new york. good to see you. welcome back. >> good to be back. >> we're at that awkward part of the negotiating process where nobody wants to be the first to step up, especially on the spending side. so do you want to be that person? can you give us some sense of where the democratic side would want to make those cuts in entitlements to get us closer to a deal? >> how in the world would you talk about cutting spending before you find out how much you have to spend? isn't this all about a revenue shortfall? the first thing we should do is find out, how much money can reraise, what is the gap, and what we can't do in terms of raising revenue we go to the cuts part. >> that's a great point. so let's do that.
from a fiscal cliff? >> congresswoman, i am a financial illiterate, can you explain to me how you have all encompassing tax reform without taking a look at tax rates? >> well, we have. we believe that we need tax reform. we'd like to look at tax rates, we'd like to look at the loopholes, the tax credits. we want a simpler, less costly tax code for america. that's important for middle class families, important for our economy. that is what's going to help get this economy growing again. but we also -- it also republicans believe it has to include the spending. and the way congress has operated in the past, you know, yeah, we'll increase revenue, but then there's never the protections, never the tough decisions to actually cut the spending, reduce the debt, and that has to be a part of this one. >> fair enough. arianna? >> congresswoman, in your thanksgiving message, twice you emphasize the need for jobs, the need for growth, and then you mentioned the deficit. what do you think we should be doing right now to help create jobs and bring about greater growth? >> well, one of the first thi
hill as the fiscal cliff looms now just 32 days away. house speaker john boehner says no progress has been made in two weeks of talks, and republicans want the white house to come up with significant spending cuts. senate democratic leader harry reid responded to boehner saying, quote, i don't understand his brain, unquote. >>> when those talks over the fiscal cliff seem to be heading towards a stalemate but do the capitol hill theatrics tell the whole story? here's thousand politico summed it up, listen to top democrats and republicans talk on camera and it sounds like they could not be further apart. but behind the scenes top officials who have been involved in the talks for many months say the contours of the deal are starting to take shape. well, joining me are jason johnson a political professor, t and a republican strategist ron bonjene, ron, let's start with you, both sides know they'll have to make a deal. one congressman says to get it there has to look like this was fighting this way it's kind of like managing the public's expectati expectations, oh, we didn't give anything,
. you can't do that in three weeks. >> so do you think we go off the fiscal cliff? >> no. all you've got to do -- you know what you've got to do on the tax side. that's simple. you have to palass a law that ss the law has to be overwritten. >> and what would be your position on that? >> i think it's the simple thing to do. obviously do what the president is saying, you know. he ran a campaign on it. the legitimacy of that. if you've got to act in three weeks, you're not going to revise the income tax code in three weeks. it may be perfectly legitimate. i think that both. personal and corporate need a lot of thought and a lot of revision. they're both broken. but you're not going to do that in three weeks. the challenge i see is in three weeks you've got to have some convincing balance of the tax side, the revenue side, with the expenditure side. it's inherent. you can't change the expenditures in three weeks. you can indicate intentions, but you can't -- >> what do you think happens then? >> i think you get some understanding about the kind of framework for dealing with the expenditure s
as i do not want to see us go over the fiscal cliff, but feel very strongly we've got to get serious here. we don't want to increase tax rates. we're not going to increase tax rates. and we want to do something about the spending problem. and remember, the good will, the piece that is, i think, determinive here, the speakers put new revenues on the table just after the election and said we get it. the president won his re-election. we wonelection. >> they know they need to put revenant on the table, but will and give them the entitlement cuts? >> we will take this as a serious matter. this is not a game. we are interested in trying to solve the problem for the american people so that we do not see taxes go up on anybody, so we can engage in reform, get the economy going again. we're not playing a game. that offer yesterday was not serious. thank you. >> that was a portion of a briefing held earlier today. eric cantor talked about a bill that the house pass today that creates a new visa program. the vote was 245-139. the house is adjourned for the week, but members return at noon on m
own party some quite comfortable with the sending his party over the fiscal cliff. two 6 ago had a comfortable conversation and the white house. i would say two thanks. despite declines the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have it to its various a barrel spending cuts. secondly, no progress has been made in the talks over the last a of weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. this is a moment for american leadership. it is the way ticket it done until washington. a mature0 lead and a had a meeting with his secretary. it was frank and d -- it was frank and direct. we saw to find out what the president is really willing to do. i remain hopeful that productive conversations can be made it into the it is ahead. elicited a leadership team met with a risk in bull's and leadership is above the business approach the warehouse as an annoyance. i have made clear that we have made the concessions on the line by putting ravenna's up front. many democrats grow up dozens of booklets that must be part of a sensible agreement that
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)